Stories; all well and good

I feel as if I should be beating dust off covers and brandishing a broom to collect the lingering spiderwebs. It has been more than a little while since last post. It’s time to finally round off that four-part series  on stories.

We need to tell good stories. We need to tell them well. Not only does it matter  that we grasp God’s big story our place in it, but we need to thoughtfully consider how the other stories we tell could be told so as to reflect that reality. As previously noted, this makes the storyteller and his story important.

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Made of Stories

Very little has stuck with me from my 18 months of Communications and Journalism. Snippets about newsworthiness, communication theory, feature writing and so on come back every now and then. One lecture, however, sticks in my head. It was the first lecture in a subject for my Journalism major, called “Storytelling, Narrative and Features.” Well-known journalist David Dale came in and set out telling us about the story of stories. What followed was arguably the most interesting lecture. David told of Chaucer, a storyteller paid in wine. He outlined how good feature journalism was doing the same as fiction: gathering ideas, doing detailed research and then telling a story. It’s about virtual reality – creating the scene that can’t be immediately seen, or created by others. The characters tell the story. David suggested that despite the common motif, storytelling may be the world’s oldest profession: perhaps some primitive man offered to sacrifice a piece of his dinner to hear his neighbour tell the tale of his hunting that day. Regardless, a good story enthrals the audience. What’s more, David managed to do that as he spoke – the story of stories was engaging, and created in us a high view of the task ahead of us.

There’s something powerful in a good story. Continue reading